2007-02-02

Music Video: Desmond Dekker - Israelites


Desmond Dekker (wikipedia)

20 comments:

Anonymous said...

GREAT tune.

Anonymous said...

Amazing song - too bad reggae today has been ruined by rap.

Cody said...

What? So you hear some reggae sounding tunes in rap songs and decide that nobody makes good reggae anymore? Do you have a point to make or are you too lazy to seek out original current reggae artists? You went out of your way to take this opportunity to slam rap music? Can you even define the boundary where Reggae and Dub and Rap begins to blur? Seriously. wtf. I liked Reggae til I realized they were mostly singing about the end of the world based on tard religion.

Anonymous said...

Too bad they're lip synching and not singing live. The audio is exactly the same as the studio single.

Cool video though.

Anonymous said...

if reggae was ruined by rap, what was rocksteady ruined by?

DanO said...

wow!
(awesome and beloved song aside even)
that club is incredible! those big bulls eyes and check out the cool lights on the tables. not to mention what everyone is wearing, most notably Desmond Dekker himself.
thanks for posting this.

jess said...

If anyone's looking for good current reggae, Matisyahu is a surprisingly excellent reggae artist.
some samples of him are on his website here:
http://www.matismusic.com/


funny thing is he's an orthodox jew, full beard and everything, but has 2 platinum selling cd's

--
sorry if this double posts

Martijn said...

Note: do you see the "Black and Dekker" thing (albumtitle?) when starting the video?

http://www.blackanddecker.com/

christoff said...

What's REALLY funny is that this has german subtitles. If I recall, this sone was HUGE in Germany. It's funny when anything is huge in Germany.

Anonymous said...

Sorry buddy, the subtitles are Dutch.

Anonymous said...

somebody is getting nationalistic.. ;)

Sean said...

That is so fucking whack. I have had that song stuck in my head all morning, must have played it on a mix CD someone made for me 100 times in a row at the book store i was sitting in.

WHY TODAY???

You're fucking spying on me, obviously.

P-E Fronning said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
P-E Fronning said...

Sean: Martin Klasch sees all. I know, it's scary!

emperor91108 said...

too too kool!!! What a great video.

Jonathan said...

Ohhhh... Ohhhhhh... My ears are alight!

Orion said...

Hey Cody,
Saying that most reggae music is about the end of the world, and dismissing Rastafari as a "tard religion" is just as ignorant as regarding all rap as bad music.

Nicolaus D. said...

for one i think the top commentor was refering to Ragga and Dancehall (contemporary popular jamacian music) which has been heavily influenced by and heavily influences Rap. the aforementioned not being to my taste. but before one pines for the reformulation of early reggae forms of the 50's 60's and 70's one should keep in mind that the Jamacain music scene has always acted a king of synthetic pump for pop music, however with one globaly powerful period of independent, self formulated, nationalistic, rastafarian-centric music. that is to say: the beginings of modern jamaican recorded music appears with the importing of 50's R&B recordings. jamaican artist then began covering these tracks and releasing them on lo-fi equipment and reaching audiences in jamaica through what is know as Sound-Systems (usually racks of speakers mounted on a truck, roving party machines!) see the early biography of Lee "Scratch" Perry, his beginnings with Sir Coxsone Dodd, etc. anyway this developed into Ska or Ska-Voovie as it was initially dubbed, elliciting some original songwriting, as was allowed by the fact that the Sound-System producers slowly became full fledged record producers in their own rights. anyway after the advent of Ska (1961-4) there was a peculiar incidence wherein the beat slowed drasticly over the course of a few years (see the diffences in Festival winning tracks), this may have been due to increasingly hot summering in jamaica in the mid to late '60s, therefore arising RockSteady, and other variants of the a slowed down Ska upbeat. eventually the advent of Rastafarianism as the popular religion of Jamaica (behind Protestants) the influence of Rastafarian religious doctrine begings to show in what is now known as roots reggae and following the slowing beat of jamaican music Dub.

Anonymous said...

Anyone have a link to the lyrics? I can't make most of them out, which is very frustrating.

Anonymous said...

Great song. Was on the soundtrack of "Drugstore Cowboy."